Conference Sessions

Session times will be assigned and announced in the near future.  All sessions will take place at the Jung Hotel, the sessions listed below have all be selected for the 2019 AUCCCO Conference.

Creative Outreach Programming: Single Servings - Treating Students to Wellness

Presenters:
Koko Nishi - San Diego State University

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Many of today's college students have diverse needs and seek personalized, immediate resources with low-time commitments. This presentation will provide a description of the background, design, implementation and the effectiveness of the Single Servings workshop series, an innovative educational programming workshop series developed by San Diego State University's Counseling & Psychological Services (C&PS) with the idea of providing students with the opportunity to "get single servings of self-care skills" each week at various locations on campus. With this program, students have the opportunity to learn skills related to various topics, including social anxiety, test anxiety, connecting with others, mindfulness, stress management, self-care, family/cultural pressures, and relationships. Single Servings is designed to proactively educate students regarding mental health issues, to increase engagement with university wellness resources and to promote visibility and awareness of counseling center services, particularly with underrepresented communities on campus. This program will highlight the rationale, planning, challenges and lessons learned in implementing a creative and collaborative outreach program focused on decreasing mental health stigma, providing students the opportunity to learn and discuss developmental issues relevant to their college experiences. Attendees will also learn how they may develop similar programming at their respective institutions.


Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will explore strategies to engage students in mental health topics aimed at increasing wellness and attaining educational goals.
  • Participants will increase their understanding of possible challenges and lessons learned in implementing an educational outreach programming series through collaborations with various campus departments and communities.
  • Participants will participate in a discussion regarding implications of implementing similar collaborative programming in their own academic settings.

Assessment Story Project Report #1: What's Big? What's Easy?

Presenters:
Forrest Seymour - Keene State College Counseling Center
Marian Reiff - University of Pennsylvania
Soumya Madabhushi - University of Pennsylvania
Julia Nedry - Westfield State University

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Assessment (this includes approaches to assessment and evaluation in counseling)

There is a well documented need to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of outreach activities at both individual and community levels 1,2,3,4. The Assessment Story Project is an initiative of the AUCCCO Research & Assessment Sub-Committee intended to help expand the research base for Counseling Center outreach and prevention by gathering and sharing members' collective wisdom around assessment.  This includes the struggles, challenges, successes and philosophical quandaries from which new and seasoned outreach professionals can learn and build upon.  This presentation will be built upon the first set of stories collected from a range of colleagues including interview video and audio clips, useful resources shared by the interviewees and discussion of themes found in this qualitative research 5,6,7.  Themes include over-assessment, conflicting purposes for assessment (e.g., for assessing needs and target populations, accountability, quality improvement, and justifying use of resources for programming), boutique-assessment and more. The presentation will be interactive and discussion based in alignment with the research project methodology; participants own connections and experiences with assessment will be integrated into the project. In addition, full ASP interviews will be made available on the members' only section of the AUCCCO website for participant follow-up.


Learning Objective(s):

  • Identify steps often taken in developing and implementing effective assessment strategies.
  • Articulate challenges typically found in conducting and assessing outreach in college & university counseling center settings.
  • List the variety of different reasons why counseling centers collect assessment data.
  • Identify big and easy ways to conduct outcome research at their home center.

Responsive Outreach Utilizes All

Presenters:
Helen Hsu - Stanford University
Riley Cropper - Stanford University

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Counseling Professional Identity and Practice Issues

This workshop identifies elements to balance tensions between tailoring outreach efforts to meet cultural community or departmental needs and engaging all counseling staff in outreach responsibilities. Within many University Counseling Centers outreach tasks have disproportionately fallen upon clinicians who represent marginalized communities, which creates an additional labor expectation or "identity tax". This workshop identifies specific role expectations and organizational approaches to integrate outreach projects at every level from trainees, clinical staff of various expertise areas, and management within the counseling center. Methods of building in structural equity and outreach emphasis include minimum outreach requirements for all counselors, yearlong outreach and social justice seminar, additional training opportunities, liaison responsibilities to connect with campus communities, and partnering with other departments as appropriate (for example counselors offering grief support in tandem with Office of Religious Life and Resident Deans.)  This program builds upon previous presentations emphasizing how to create a culture of outreach outreach as a responsibility, skills set, and role for all.  It will provide examples of adaptations counselors have made in response to feedback from specific populations, format options for outreach, presenting in cultural centers and spaces, and responding to world events which impact specific campus populations.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able identify different levels of organizational responsibilities in a culture of  all-department outreach.
  • Participants will compare examples of college outreach planning informed by feedback and assess suitability for their campuses.
  • Participants will understand a model for connectivity in outreach between UCC and campus departments and generate at least 2 new partnerships goals.

Flipping the Script: Multi-Modal Approach in Engaging and Mobilizing the Asian American Communities

Presenters:
Junichi Shimaoka - UC Santa Barbara

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Counseling Professional Identity and Practice Issues

"Oh, is there a need for support space for Asian American students?"  This simple question exemplifies the lack of awareness of the unique challenges and the Model Minority Myth at work.  A consequence of such sentiment is that Asian American & Pacific Islander (AAPI) students, faculty, and staff feel invisible, excluded, and unimportant on college campuses.  Despite a sizable representation of Asian identified students at UC Santa Barbara (26%), the AAPI students report a lack of sense of belonging with the university and a lack of community among Asian American students.    The first half of this presentation will highlight the successes and challenges from the community engagement efforts over the past 3 years at UCSB, including the types of workshop/programming/community events delivered, collaboration and partnerships formed across campus, and our roles in the advocacy and social justice work as outreach professionals.  In the second half, participants will examine how their counseling centers are meeting the needs of Asian American community on respective campuses, and what their roles are in the advocacy and social justice efforts.  Together, we can "Flip the Script" and work toward realizing the Asian American communities that are more visible, empowered, respected, thriving, resilient, and well-served.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to examine their counseling center's readiness and competence in meeting the needs of Asian American campus communities.
  • Participants will be able to describe the roles they can play in the advocacy, social justice, and community engagement efforts for Asian American communities on their campus.

Feeling the Love: An approach to working with couples and providing romantic relationship programming through outreach

Presenters:
Johanna Strokoff - University of Illinois at Chicago

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Counseling Theory/Practice and the Counseling Relationship

Providing outreach programming for couples and discussing romantic relationships is a fun, engaging way to interact with the student body. Learn about a series of successful workshops provided to University of Illinois at Chicago students, incorporating programming on concepts like perspectives on online dating, Gary Chapman's: The 5 Love Languages, and how to heal from breakups. Discuss approaches and considerations when providing programming to couples, along with suggestions to increase attendance to these unique programs.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss ways to design outreach programming to couples on college campuses
  • Describe unique considerations when providing programming surrounding romantic relationships and working with couples via outreach, including logistical factors and multicultural considerations

How To Create an (AAPI)phany At Your University: Creative Programming to Support Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Students

Presenters:
Koko Nishi - San Diego State University

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Social and Cultural Foundations

(AAPI)phany was created out of the need to provide a space to discuss and explore identity development and mental health within the AAPI community. The absence of an Asian American Studies Major or other institutionalized AAPI learning programs was a primary impetus for starting (AAPI)phany. (AAPI)phany is a biweekly, workshop created in collaboration with the Counseling & Psychological Services (C&PS), and the Center for Intercultural Relations (CIR) at San Diego State University. The student-led initiative provides a space for Asian Pacific Islander (AAPI) students to discuss topics related to their racial/ethnic identity, other social identities, and how those identities connect back to mental health, psychosocial functioning, and the current socio-political climate. The over-encompassing goal has been to strengthen the university's ability to successfully support and address the needs of the AAPI community by way of providing specialized services to address their social-emotional and mental health needs. This presentation will provide a description of the background, design, implementation and the effectiveness of the (AAPI)phany workshop series. Presenters will facilitate a discussion with attendees regarding some of the challenges, lessons learned and best practices in implementing similar collaborative programming at their respective institutions.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will explore strategies to engage AAPI college students in mental health topics aimed at increasing overall wellness and achievement of educational goals.
  • Participants will increase their understanding of issues and challenges faced by AAPI college students and effective approaches for supporting them.
  • Participants will identify successful approaches and lessons learned in the development of a workshop series that focuses on the promotion of community and coalition building among underrepresented populations.
  • Participate in a discussion regarding implications of implementing similar collaborative programming in their own academic settings.

De-stigmatizing Mental Health-- Keep Talking: End the Stigma

Presenters:
Brittany Bouffard - University of Colorado Denver
Noreen Gul Khan - University of Colorado Denver

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

We talk with students individually in our offices about their life experiences, struggles, and mental health, and yet imagine how many walk out the door silent with their friends or loved ones. The public and personal discriminatory stigma of mental health-- and even of especially pervasive human experiences like shame or anxiety-- can cause decreased support seeking, lowered confidence, and internalized negative beliefs of self. Thusly an entire student body can walk by each other every day, silent and missing to their own likeness and connection.  So the University of Colorado Denver's Counseling Center and Case Management offices joined forces to create the spoken word event Keep Talking: End the Stigma, where students read their stories aloud to an audience of peers and supporters, shedding light on the very often shared experiences of being human.  This presentation will review the de-stigmatizing, multicultural, multimodal impetus behind this prevention program, plus describe event logistics any campus could personalize, including garnering campus partnerships and financial support, advertising, submission coordination, and reflections of the final event.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will discuss ways in which mental health stigma affects their own campus, as well as nationally and internationally.
  • Participants will be able to describe negative affects of discrimination and stigma from research literature shared in the presentation.
  • Participants will reflect upon needs of their own student body regarding diverse concerns of stigmatization.
  • Participants will be able to consider designing their own such program for their particular campus around de-stigmatizing mental health.
  • Participants will demonstrate their own perspectives by giving feedback about CU Denver's event and constructing their own ideas on how to better such an event.

Living More as Ourselves (LMAO) - Saying "Yes, and..." to Social Anxiety

Presenters:
Matthew Poon - Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

To address the increasing number of students presenting with social anxiety, Living More as Ourselves (LMAO) was developed and piloted on the Columbia University Irving Medical Center campus in Fall 2018. This four week workshop, informed by mindfulness, self-compassion, and improv comedy principles, offered health science graduate students the opportunity to 1) understand the positive and negative functions of anxiety, 2) playfully act out and tolerate scenes that elicited anxiety, and 3) process each scenario within a small group. This presentation will provide an overview of the planning and development process, a brief summary of mindfulness and improv comedy principles, weekly agendas and execution, and limitations and next steps. At the end of the presentation, four to six brave participants will be asked to engage in a live "short form" improv game.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to apply mindfulness and improv comedy principles to their clinical and outreach/programming work.
  • Participants will be able to experience, assess, and process a short form improv exercise in service of understanding the student experience.

On a Budget: Creating a Successful Division-Wide De-stress Event for Students

Presenters:
Michele Juarez-Huffaker - University of Delaware
Kelsey Chambers - University of Delaware

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

After observing an increase of student suicides on campus coinciding with final exams, the Center for Counseling and Student Development at the University of Delaware aimed to create a pre-finals wellness program in hopes of reaching at-risk students. With a limited programming budget, it was essential to collaborate with partners from the Division of Student Life. In doing so, we cultivated a creative outreach program including music, art, food, and information on campus resources that was attended by more than 250 students over a 2-hour period. We successfully made contact with students who may not otherwise feel comfortable accessing counseling center resources due to cultural beliefs and the stigma surrounding mental health care. Our program will demonstrate how to establish working relationships necessary for large-scale outreach initiatives on a small budget; meeting outreach needs of potentially at-risk students; how to interact and consult with students in a way that decreases anxiety when speaking with a mental health professional for the first time; how to integrate a variety of creative arts and crafts, including a community Gratitude Tree.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the challenges and concerns related to coordinating a large outreach event on a limited budget
  • Demonstrate the importance of developing strong relationships with campus partners for outreach programming
  • Identify and address stigmas of mental health that reduce help-seeking behaviors of at-risk students

Making Workshops Work: Defining and Marketing Psycho-Educational Programs at Counseling Centers.

Presenters:
Chiaothong Yong - The Ohio State University
Harry Warner - The Ohio State University

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Assessment (this includes approaches to assessment and evaluation in counseling)

This session is a continuation on a conversation about the utility of psycho-educational workshops. In the past, we have discussed the framework for setting up a program and the frequency in which students report using the skills we teach them. This year we hope to explore what are the components that make a workshop and why we may consider what makes it an impactful intervention. To address the need for multi-modal service delivery, centers must think creatively to find solutions to increasing demands. Rationale for prevention efforts are difficult to communicate to administration and community collaborators. Presenters will discuss three semesters of survey data to support the utility of this program to increase buy-in. Lastly, we will showcase student testimonial captured via short video clips.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Clearly define the components of a psycho-educational workshop and describe this to students and administrators.
  • Consider the results of three semesters worth of survey data collected from students who attended psycho-educational workshops. Specifically, the data will explain students' perceptions on how workshops impact stress and mental health.
  • Ethically elicit and distribute students' testimonials to increase student buy-in and awareness of psycho-educational workshops.

Reach In, Reach Out: Touching the Masses through Innovative Outreach

Presenters:
Calena Creft - North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University
Lindsey Parisi - North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

In this workshop, presenters will discuss cultural competencies through a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) perspective on how to foster student engagement through different outreach programs. Counseling Services partners with student organizations to deliver fun, yet educational information on a variety of mental health and wellness topics including: consent, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, healthy relationships, alcohol and other drugs, and suicide awareness. Presenters will provide information on effective outreach planning and implementation, ways of overcoming barriers and challenges, collaborations with campus and community partners, recruitment of volunteers, and training of peer educators. Presenters will also provide examples of social media and other promotional efforts.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Demonstrate how to create and brand innovative outreach programs.
  • Acquire skills on using technology and social media as effective promotional tools for growing your program.
  • Gain knowledge on how to collaborate and develop sustainable outreach with budget limitations and restrictions.

Inclusion from the Ground Up

Presenters:
Christy Hutton - MU Counseling Center
Ashley Brickley - MU Disability Center

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Social and Cultural Foundations

Counseling Centers and their home institutions are often highly focused on inclusivity, creating programs and policies to enhance the safety of every student. In the context of inclusion, people with disabilities are often an afterthought. While it is not uncommon for an outreach event to be adapted for a person with a disability, rarely is outreach designed from the beginning with disability in mind. This session will discuss the Social Model of Disability as a construct for social justice and a spring board for greater inclusivity.  The Social Model of Disability helps us consider disability as a social construct and to consider our implicit role in exclusion of students with disabilities. Utilizing principles from Universal Design and the Social Model of Disability, we challenge outreach professionals to step back from what has been to bring outreach to a whole new level of inclusivity.  From curb cuts to more complex considerations of disability as an aspect of identity and a social justice issue, you will leave this session empowered to create outreach that is inclusive from the ground up.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to discuss disability as an aspect of diversity and consider the diversity within disability.
  • Participants will be able to discuss the social model of disability and how it can help us shape inclusive outreach.
  • Participants will be able to engage in best practices for designing accessible outreach.

"SANA SANA: Creating a culture of self-care and community among Latinx college students at a PWI"

Presenters:
Rosemary Magana - Northwestwestern University Counseling and Psycholgoical Services

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Predominantly White institutions (PWIs) are rooted in systems of privilege and oppression.  For students holding marginalized identities, PWIs are difficult and even harmful environments to navigate.  These students face barriers to their academic success and overall well-being, such as isolation and a lack of belongingness.  This presentation will first review the unique challenges and stressors confronting Latinx-identified students at PWIs.  Next, a culturally-affirming outreach support group will be presented as a valuable tool for promoting connection, wellness, and academic success amidst such adverse circumstances.  At Northwestern University, this group is called "SANA SANA Gathering Space," whose name references a Spanish song ("Sana Sana Colita de Rana") of hope and healing.  SANA SANA was created as an empowering space for all Latinx-identified students to build community, explore their cultural identities, and engage in self-care.  Throughout the presentation, SANA SANA will be used as a framework for clarifying the intention, purpose, and process of developing culturally-affirming support groups at PWIs. Finally, participants will discuss their challenges and successes to inform their efforts in developing support groups for students who hold intersecting marginalized identities.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe how navigating a PWI as a college student who holds marginalized identities may impact the student's wellness and academic success.
  • Describe the liaison work and relationship building strategies needed for the development a support group for students who hold marginalized identities on a PWI.
  • Explain how to create a support group for students who hold marginalized identities on a PWI.

Trauma and Resiliency Informed Outreach

Presenters:
Rebecca Rampe - UNCW
Soumya Madabhushi - University of Pennsylvania

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) affect over 67% of Americans and have an impact on health behaviors (CDC, 1998). Within the college population, studies have found that ACEs lead to higher levels of depression and ADHD with an increase in cigarette, marijuana and alcohol use (Windle et.al., 2018). Providing trauma and resiliency informed outreach programming is therefore, necessary in order to mitigate the impact of ACES by increasing resiliency as well as to minimize further traumatization.  Current research also indicates a need for ACEs to be considered in trauma and resiliency informed care on college campuses and within prevention/intervention programs (Forster et al., 2018). This presentation will include a review of ACEs with a focus on the impact on student health behaviors and the implications for UCC professionals. ACEs data collected by the UNCW Counseling Center and how this data is being used in programming, and services provided will be shared. Ways to integrate Trauma and Resiliency Informed Care principles into outreach programming will be discussed. The presentation will be interactive and allow for participants to generate ideas for intentional programming to incorporate resiliency and trauma informed care into outreach.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will define ACEs
  • Participants will discuss ACEs influence on health behaviors and student success in college
  • Participants will generate personal ideas on how to incorporate ACEs work into prevention/intervention programming
  • Participants will reflect on providing trauma and resiliency informed care within UCC outreach

Student Mental Health Summit: Educating and Empowering Students

Presenters:
Suzie Stadelman - University of Oregon
Kyra Ortega-Schwartz - University of Oregon
Mariko Lin - University of Oregon

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

As part of programming for National Mental Health Month, we added a day-long Mental Health Summit for undergraduate and graduate students. The goals of the summit were to reduce stigma around mental health concerns and inform and connect students to wellness and self-care resources. We provided educational breakout sessions facilitated by students and professionals. We collaborated with academic departments to present research and resources on well-being, to highlight the work that is happening on our campus, and to provide professional development for student presenters.   An additional goal was to conduct a needs assessment via student forums and a program evaluation. We wanted to learn more about student perception of mental health on campus, knowledge of mental health services, and feedback about how resources could be improved or expanded. Opportunities were also provided to underrepresented communities to share the unique factors and barriers that influence their mental health. We will share the step-by-step logistical aspects of planning this event, insight gained from student feedback, evaluation data, and future directions.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Replicate planning and execution of a mental health summit or similar event
  • Utilize needs assessment data to apply to home campus practices
  • Develop outreach and education that emphasizes student feedback, especially underrepresented communities

Addressing The Big Picture- Utilizing A Needs Assessment To Guide Outreach Programming For International Students

Presenters:
Shraddha Niphadkar - University of Missouri-Columbia Counseling Center
Charles Burgess - University of Missouri- Columbia Counseling Center
Christy Hutton - University of Missouri-Columbia Counseling Center

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Over the course of the past several years, students on the campus of the University of Missouri (MU) experienced a number of significant sociopolitical events. These included campus-wide protests in 2015 which highlighted racial tensions on campus (Fortunato, Gigliotti, & Ruben, 2017), the 2016 U.S. election which further highlighted sociopolitical divides, and the 2017 travel ban which disproportionately impacted international students from middle-eastern countries (Rose-Redwood & Rose-Redwood, 2017). Based on guidelines for assessing the mental health needs of students of color on college campuses published by the Steve Fund and Jed Foundation (2017), the outreach committee at the MU Counseling Center began a needs assessment to get input from the students directly about issues that are impacting them and develop or adapt outreach programs to better serve their needs. While this assessment began as an attempt to sample a broad range of students, international students emerged as a population of particular interest. In this presentation we will describe our process of developing the needs assessment, including challenges that we faced and how we responded; share information about our process of gathering data and developing collaborations with student organizations; and describe implications of findings for campus outreach tailored to international students.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the importance of, and challenges associated with conducting a needs assessment targeted at international students on college campuses. Presenters will explain how they overcame many of the challenges that came up for them in the process.
  • Describe how to identify and collaborate with campus partners in developing intervention and outreach.
  • Discuss how the results could help guide the development or modification of outreach, to best meet the needs of international students on campuses.

"When the Saints go marching out: Implementing a Peer Education program"

Presenters:
Melissa Zarin - Stevens Institute of Technology
Margaret Marks - University of Kentucky Counseling Center
Sudha Wadhwani - Montclair State University Counseling and Psychological Services
Natalie Deering - Eastern Kentucky University Counseling Center
Jeffrey Graham -University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

The mental health needs of college students have grown significantly in the last 10 years. In reaction to this, many college counseling centers have developed peer education/advocate programs. Research and practice has shown that peer support is a critical part of engaging more students.  Peer education/advocate programs seek to break down barriers and counseling center walls to reach students in their worlds, where they study, work, live, and engage and are particularly useful in reaching students who may not traditionally seek out counseling services.    This panel presentation will includes peer education program coordinators from schools diverse in size, geographical location, focus, and in varying stages of development from long standing successful programs to newly developed programs. Presenters will share details about the development of their Peer education/advocate programs, logistical decisions and strategies (e.g.,  recruiting and selection process, training, responsibilities of students), and challenges and successes related to developing a foundation for a solid program. In addition, panel members will field questions from the audience.

Learning Objective(s):

  • To better understand how Peer Education can assist with reaching and serving a wider range of students and contribute to destigmatizing mental health.
  • Learn logistical considerations and strategies for implementing a peer ed/advocate program at various sized institutions and geographical locations.
  • Summarize the challenges and rewards of utilizing peer ed/advocate programs.
  • Provide the opportunity for the panel and audience members to  exchange wisdom with regards to the various stages of their peer ed/advocate program development construction.

A Little Lagniappe Leading to a Big Idea: Collaboration between Counseling Center and Health Promotion Office

Presenters:
Dustin Johnson - Auburn University Student Counseling and Psychological Services
Markie Pasternak - Auburn University Health Promotion and Wellness Services

Session Length: 60-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Multiple higher education associations (e.g., National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, or NASPA) have converged its leaders (e.g., Call to Action for Well-being Research Summit) to prioritize the merging of both mental health and overall well-being initiatives on university campuses.  Consistent with this effort, Auburn University hired a coordinator for Mental Well-being in the Health Promotion and Wellness office, charged with collaborating with the Assistant Director for Outreach at the Counseling Center.  This collaboration paid immediate dividends and allowed the university to develop informal, but strong, channels of communication among various campus units to streamline delivery of preventative mental health services to students.  This seminar will provide a brief primer on how the newly formed collaboration of the counseling center and health promotion offices at Auburn University had been able to develop a cost-effective, collaboration system among various service-oriented units on the campus through its "A Sound Mind" program.  It will highlight the theories from both the Psychology and Higher Education Administration training domains that were most vital in meeting the goals set by the coordinators for mental health outreach in both offices.  Finally, it will describe the signature programs born out of the collaboration of those two offices.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Examine one university's example of how the health promotion office was integrated into the mental health outreach program that had been previously been completely under the purview of the counseling center.
  • Discuss what theories of health, change, promotion, and student development were most utilized to develop the approach to outreach established by the two offices.
  • List the relative strengths and growth areas that reside within the training models for both counselors and student affairs professionals.

Innovative and Intercultural Competent Training for Outreach and Prevention

Presenters:
Deidre Weathersby - University of Illinois
Erica Lennon - University of North Carolina Charlotte
Lilian Odera - Towson University

Session Length: 90-Minute
Topic: Counseling Professional Identity and Practice Issues

The workshop will consider three unique training models for outreach and prevention.  All three counseling centers have APA accredited training programs but approach the supervision, training and mentoring of outreach in varying ways.  One approach will consider a curriculum based training approach in a weekly seminar covering foundations of prevention, social justice praxis, ethical considerations, assessment and collaborations to name a few.  Another example will present a yearlong program that covers trainees identifying an undeserved population, evaluating need, developing a program and assessment.  This approach has led to sustainable outreach programs and served student populations in ways that consider cultural humility.  Trainees develop a full range of skills considering this opportunity to work collectively on a community intervention.  Finally, an approach to training from a counseling center that is part of the consortium of urban and metropolitan universities will provide an additional example of implementing training for outreach, prevention and consultation.  In this approach, Interns are expected to serve on the outreach and consultation team and provide feedback on issues germane to a diverse population of students.  In conjunction with staff, interns and other trainees are expected to deliver and assess outreach programs.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to identity tenants of training that will be suitable to their settings
  • Participants will determine which APA competencies for training will fit in their programs for training in outreach and prevention
  • Participants will be provided with a curriculum for training in outreach and prevention and list which components to implement in their own settings
  • Participants will have opportunity to discourse on relevant issues in training for outreach and prevention

The Next Big Idea in UCC Outreach: Standards of Practice

Presenters:
Batsirai Bvunzawabaya - University of Pennsylvania CAPS
Erica Lennon - UNC Charlotte CAPS
Becca Rampe - UNCW Counseling Center

Session Length: 90-Minute
Topic: Counseling Professional Identity and Practice Issues

The Association for University and College Counseling Center Outreach (AUCCCO) was established in 2007. Since then there has been tremendous growth in membership, scope of focus and influence on the field of mental health outreach on campuses across the country. The importance of prevention, education and utilizing a public health approach for college counseling center outreach has been clearly stated (Asidao & Sevig, 2014; Glass, 2016; Misner, 2014). At this time, most counseling centers are undergoing mergers with health or wellness offices thus influencing the landscape of outreach programming in university counseling centers. Given the unique services of prevention, intervention, and postvention provided by UCC outreach professionals, now is the time for big changes through clearly defining our role as outreach providers. Asidao and Sevig, (2014) have outlined six outreach standards and competency areas for outreach providers.  These competencies could be an avenue to re-state our values and skills while informing administrators, campus partners, and trainees how to engage in outreach work successfully. This presentation will provide: a) the challenges and benefits of developing outreach competencies, b) a framework of suggested competencies, and c) allow participants to co-construct in the shaping of these competencies based on their work.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the challenges and benefits of developing outreach competencies
  • Evaluate the suggested competencies and their utility and applicability to their specific work.

Level Up Your Suicide prevention

Presenters:
Jamye Banks - University of Michigan
Amanda Byrnes - University of Michigan
Edward Huebner - University of Michigan
Sheryl Kelly - University of Michigan

Session Length: 90-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Suicide prevention is one of the core areas of outreach in counseling centers. Suicide rates are increasing nationwide and students' self-reported prevalence rates of threat to self (i.e., serious suicidal thoughts, attempts) increased for the 8th year in a row (CCMH, 2018). Thus, suicide prevention at University of Michigan CAPS continues to evolve and be vital to our work. In 2006, we launched QPR training on campus, and in 2012 we needed to think bigger. Messages of Hope were created, which led to the launch of our larger campaign, Do Something: Stop Student Suicide. Through continued growth, we have leveled up our suicide prevention efforts by creating a multicultural-focused follow-up training to QPR, developing QPR specifically for men, updating our suicide prevention website, extending accessibility of the Messages of Hope Board, and creating more action oriented messages through an interactive "I Will Change the Story" board. Our "Big Ideas" increase collaboration among units/depts and contribute to a community of caring.   During this presentation, we will discuss how we have leveled up our efforts, engage participants on how to incorporate more active approaches, and identify strategies to bring back to their centers.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the growth of the Stop Student Suicide initiative
  • Explain how suicide prevention work may feed creativity and add to work satisfaction
  • Demonstrate how elevating efforts can reach diverse communities throughout the campus
  • Create goals for participants' suicide prevention work through group discussion and experiential activities
  • Develop strategies to take a hands on approach that relates to new generations of students that come to campus

Making the Big a little easier: Blending prevention and intervention through mental health literacy and gatekeeper training

Presenters:
Heather Walders - University of South Florida
Patricia Lobo Arena - University of Miami
Amy Crandall - University of Miami
Megan Marks - University of Kentucky

Session Length: 90-Minute
Topic: Wellness and Prevention

Many college campus outreach programs endeavor to increase mental health literacy, reduce stigma, and encourage help seeking behaviors in students and employees. While one traditional goal of mental health awareness campaigns is education, not all campaigns are designed to engage the target audience beyond knowledge. Training programs such as Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) and Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) allow a bigger picture to be addressed by providing the minority (faculty and staff) an action plan to support the majority (students) on a daily basis.  This "bigger picture approach" encourages faculty and staff to foster emotional connections to students and promote workplace cohesion. Providing mental health literacy focused training to faculty and staff, as well as student leaders, acts as both prevention and intervention. This approach can be employed at universities of all sizes and promotes effective collaboration with harder to reach departments such as STEM, International Students, Medicine, and Health. Having additional trained individuals, or additionally gate keepers, on campus affords more resources to be available for on-campus events and shelter-in-place crisis work. This presentation will focus on the costs, benefits, unexpected results, and challenges at three different universities using health literacy training programs.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to identify commonalties in mental health literacy and gatekeeper programs.
  • Participants will understand the goals of providing mental health literacy and gatekeeper programs.
  • Participants will be able to describe the benefits and potential pitfalls involved in the implementation of mental health literacy and gatekeeper programs.



The Association For University and College Counseling Center Outreach
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