60-Minute Session Schedule

All sessions will take place virtually.

Wednesday, June 2, 2021

1:30 - 2:30 PM EST

AUCCCO Annual Survey: Telling our Outreach story of the dual pandemics.

Presenters:

Harry Warner - The Ohio State University

Teresa Michaelson-Chmelir - Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Marian Reiff - University of Pennsylvania

Jenni Thome - Illinois State University

Amanda Ramirez - Portland State University

Abstract:

This session will discuss and review results from AUCCCO's Annual Survey. This survey was intended to help tell the story of our shared experiences as Outreach professionals during the period between March 2020 to March 2021. Specific focus was given to the impact of dual pandemics of COVID-19 and ongoing racism. As Outreach professionals, we have been called upon to adapt quickly to campus needs. The intention of this survey is to capture experiences that feel solitary and then in-turn, amplify our collective voice. The annual survey was adapted and expanded with reference to previous surveys first conducted for 2016-2017. Method, response, analytics, and implications will be discussed during the session. Presenters will provide an executive summary suitable for communication to administrators and stakeholders.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the experiences of Outreach professionals between March 2020 and March 2021 as they work to provide community intervention to the University and College Student population aiming to promote positive mental health outcomes.
  • Demonstrate trends to stakeholders and administrators regarding how University and College Counseling Center Outreach professionals have worked to support the University and College Student population as it relates to the impact of COVID-19 and racism on Mental Health in the United States.

Enhancing and Advancing White Professionals' Engagement in Racial Equity Work

Presenters:

Erica Lennon - UNC Charlotte

Megan Marks - University of Kentucky

Abstract:

This session will focus on examples of strategies utilized at different universities and within AUCCCO to provide learning and growth spaces for white professionals to increase accountability and effectiveness in the area of racial equity work. Examples provided will include initiatives within counseling centers, as well as initiatives at the student affairs divisional level. Discussion regarding addressing barriers in the implementation of these spaces, including individual internal barriers of participants, internal barriers of the creators, and systemic barriers will occur.

Learning Objective(s):

  • After this session participants will be able to identify at least two types of initiatives to address the enhancement of accountability and effectiveness of white professionals in racial equity work.
  • After this session participants will be able to identify at least one strategy to address personal internal barriers in creating and implementing initiatives that promote learning/growth opportunities for white professionals in racial equity work.
  • After this session participants will be able to identify at least one strategy to utilize in addressing systemic barriers that impede increased accountability and learning/growth opportunities for white professionals in racial equity work.

Supporting Students Mental Health By Collaborating Across Campus in Branded Marketing Campaigns

Presenters:

Marci Young - Wichita State University

Jessica Provines - Wichita State University

Teri Hall - Wichita State University

Thomas Skinner - Wichita State University

Abstract:

Overview of engaging in a strategic, comprehensive approach to promoting mental wellness and education. We will take you briefly through the process of creating and implementing a branded marketing program to increase reach to the campus community. We will explore how student affairs staff can collaborate in engaging students, faculty, and staff to provide support, and review the impacts of mental health awareness and education, as well as feelings of connection to peers and the university.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Explain how utilizing a "branded" marketing approach to provide mental health support and education will increase program recognition and impact in the campus community.
  • Provide a framework for a mental health education and support program to engage in collaborations across student and academic affairs.
  • Explore the impact of this type of program on the university community by reviewing quantitative and qualitative data that has resulted from this approach.

2:45 - 3:45 PM EST

Creating Virtual Healing Spaces & Outreach for Marginalized Communities

Presenters:

Helen Hsu - Stanford University

Marissa Floro - Stanford University, Weiland Health Initiative

Abstract:

This session will provide examples and templates for outreach adaptations created by Stanford CAPS and Weiland Health Initiative as part of our Vaden Flourishing Alliance in response to the escalating mental health needs of students during a year of heightened racial trauma, pandemic isolation and grief. Primary examples will include Asian American racial trauma Community healing space, Queer Healing space and activities, and cross-campus Anti-hate website and resource project. The presenters will share their processes adapting to outreach during COVID 19 shelter in place such as developing zoom safety protocols, ensuring culturally responsive and community-based healing methods, strengthening allyships and partnerships, creating social media campaigns and resources. We will also address how an institution can support staff who are personally also living through impact of marginalized identity experiences as they simultaneously support students.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will learn how to prepare and design culturally responsive healing spaces and outreach materials for telehealth format.
  • Participants will understand methods of utilizing cultural and community resources from marginalized communities into treatment & outreach planning considerations.

Follow Us On Instagram: Meeting Students Where They Are At

Presenters:

Brooke Leach - Carson-Newman University

Abstract:

University Counseling Centers are facing increased demands for outreach as mental health concerns among college students continue to rise. If the difficulties associated with stigmatic barriers in mental health outreach were not challenging enough, we are now further called to connect with students in an ever-growing virtual world. During a pandemic. While social distancing. This presentation will discuss the benefits of University Counseling Centers using Instagram for effective and relatable outreach, as well as the innovative outreach events that can be created through this platform. As a result of this presentation, participants will gain an understanding on how to decrease barriers associated with mental health outreach, how to use Instagram to create community, how to increase followers to maximize the benefits of Instagram, as well as learn effective ways to create innovative outreach events through this platform. With an Instagram following a third of the size of our University, we are excited to share what we have learned, how we have grown, and for you to Follow us on Instagram.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will develop a plan for Instagram to help decrease barriers associated with mental health outreach.
  • Participants will acquire the skills and knowledge to utilize Instagram in creating community.
  • Participants will acquire a plan to increase Instagram followers.
  • Participants will be able to use Instagram to create new innovative outreach efforts.

Navigating Racial Stress in a Predominately White Institution

Presenters:

Louise Wheeler - Brigham Young University

Klint Hobbs - Brigham Young University

Natalie Hansen - Brigham Young University

Abstract:

Recent survey data has indicated incidents targeting students of color on campus are increasing (Jones & Baker, 2019). Such experiences contribute to "racial battle fatigue" (Smith, Allen, & Danley, 2007), or an environment of frustration, anger, anxiety, fear, and hopelessness. Racial stress can be acute at predominantly white institutions such as Brigham Young University, where recent survey research revealed students of color feel unsafe, and experience isolation and difficulty knowing where to find support (BYU Report, 2021). As students of color utilize mental health resources at lower rates than their white counterparts (Lipson, Kern, Eisenberg, & Breland-Noble, 2018), innovative approaches are needed to help students of color cope with racial stress on college campuses. To this end, BYU's Counseling and Psychological Services partnered with other campus entities in sponsoring a Racial Stress Awareness Week. The event objectives included helping students of color understand and cope with racial stress as well as helping majority students recognize and understand interactions that can contribute to racial stress. Our presentation highlights unique factors that contribute to racial stress on BYU campus, activities and initiatives implemented to help those experiencing racial stress, and efforts to increase awareness of racial stress among majority students on campus.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Increase recognition and understanding of specific aspects of racial trauma that occur for students of color attending predominantly white institutions
  • Discuss specific ways to respond to the unique needs of marginalized students

Thursday, June 3, 2021

1:15 - 2:15 PM EST

Digital Awakenings: Leaning into the "Co-vantages" of the COVID pandemic

Presenters:

Rosa West - University of Florida

Abstract:

The COVID pandemic caused an abrupt halt to the traditional ways of reaching out and supporting collegiate mental health. Confused and lost, many college counseling centers found themselves scrambling to stay connected with students and adjust to online platforms to continue providing care. In this presentation, you will learn about the "Co-vantages" the UF Counseling & Wellness Center identified in the development of several new online programs designed to support tele-reach efforts. Learn about CWC Talks, a podcast providing conversations on various mental health-related topics or Ask-It!, an online platform for mental health consultation. This presentation will also outline the development of CWC's online Workshops & Events program which focuses on strengthening student resilience, development of healthy self-care habits, and growing mental health awareness. This program will also feature multiple student-led online care initiatives; including Gator-2-Gator (peer support), Letters of Care (asynchronous peer support), and AWARE Live (a series student ambassadors discuss relevant and timely topics related to mental health on Instagram Live). Lastly, we will highlight our engagement with Social Media in connecting with students, including our Ask-Me-Anything (AMA) tele-reaches on Reddit.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to identify 1-2 challenges experienced by students because of the COVID pandemic.
  • Participants will gain greater understanding of the effect of COVID on digital communication and its impact on mental health.
  • Participants will be able to identify and adopt 1-2 strategies for expanding tele-reach services for college students.

Let's Talk in the Time of COVID

Presenters:

Sudha Wadhwani - Montclair State University

Jane Yang - Emory University, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

Megan Marks - University of Kentucky

Harry Warner - The Ohio State University

Abstract:

In the unprecedented time of COVID-19, it is even more critical to increase access to care for undergraduate and graduate/professional students who are enduring significantly greater challenges than ever before. On top of the already complex concerns they may have experienced prior to COVID, our students are now having to adapt to increased isolation, family stressors, health concerns and disparities, increased financial challenges, grief and loss, sociopolitical stressors, and continued racial and social injustice, in addition to their ongoing academic demands. It has been imperative to shift our prevention and treatment modalities to on-line platforms, to provide virtual methods of support, connection, and intervention, particularly for at-risk and underserved student populations. The Let's Talk drop-in support and consultation program, developed by Cornell University and adapted by over 100 colleges and universities, has gone virtual to continue to reach our students and particularly to create opportunities to overcome inter-state telehealth restrictions. This presentation will focus on how Let's Talk has been adapted by 4 different universities during the pandemic, discuss how campus stakeholders have participated in the development/transition of Let's Talk, and allow an opportunity for participants to consider how to develop or transition Let's Talk at their respective institutions.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will gain knowledge of the mission and purpose of Let's Talk to reach underserved students and increase access to support in their cultural worlds.
  • Participants will be able to discuss how Let's Talk can be used in consultation with stakeholders to demonstrate flexibility and access to services.
  • Participants will learn how 4 different universities have transformed their Let's Talk programs to virtual platforms.
  • Participants will have the opportunity to share and problem solve developing a virtual Let's Talk program at their respective universities.

Self-Care and the UCC Professional: Creative Strategies for Wellness

Presenters:

Terry Brown - Ringling College of Art and Design

Billy Palmer - Ringling College of Art and Design

Laura Bonnemort - Ringling College of Art and Design

Abstract:

The importance of self-care for mental health professionals has been documented extensively in the literature. In this time of the COVID-19 pandemic, proper self-care has become even more important for those working in the mental health field, such as UCC professionals. In addition to psychological symptoms which may occur in the absence of self-care (i.e., burnout, vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue, and secondary traumatic stress), if UCC professionals do not take the physical self-care precautions suggested by the CDC, the consequences could be serious. Additionally, the APA ethical standards indicate that counselor self-care should be a priority for practicing professionals. For this presentation, we discuss several creative self-care strategies for UCC professionals provided under the lenses of macro and micro self-care as discussed by Bush (2015) and using the dimensions suggested by Posluns and Gail (2020): awareness, balance, flexibility, physical health, social support, and spirituality.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Those attending our discussion will learn creative ways to maintain their self-care.
  • Those attending our discussion will understand the differences between macro and micro self-care and examples of both.
  • Those attending our discussion will learn a number of self-care dimensions as well as examples of each dimension.

You belong here: Fostering community and connection to Nourish women of color

Presenters:

Jamye Banks - University of Michigan

LaTonya Demps - University of Michigan

Sheryl Kelly - University of Michigan

Reena Sheth - University of Michigan

Danielle Zohrob - University of Michigan

Abstract:

A constant, evolving challenge in the counseling center world is a combination of the increase in clinical demand and severity of concerns, made more complex by the current socio-political climate and COVID-19. Nourish, a collective healing space for students, staff, and faculty focuses on self-identified women of color and strives to meet this challenge. Held as a monthly, drop-in lunch series, Nourish is, first and foremost, a community building space. Grounded in the social justice values of empowerment, intersectional identity exploration, and holistic wellness, each Nourish session creates a highly collaborative, open, and spirited atmosphere for participants to facilitate self-expression, reflection, and open dialogue. Individuals come together to foster connections and community by exploring issues ranging from pop culture, politics, race, gender, privilege, colorism, and intercultural differences. This interactive presentation will take you on a behind-the-scenes journey of Nourish. You will learn how to plan, launch, and sustain a community-based series in collaboration with other campus partners, and gain insight into our transition to a virtual platform. You will also have an opportunity to explore multicultural considerations and challenges in creating and offering community and identity-based programming, and participate in a brief experiential demonstration of a Nourish session.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Share the history and purpose of Nourish
  • Demonstrate how Nourish actively and intentionally contributes to campus community well-being, especially during this critical time
  • Identify ways to bring similar programming to your campus
  • Multicultural considerations and challenges for creating and facilitating identity specific healing spaces

Friday, June 4, 2021

12:00 - 1:00 PM EST

Ain't Nobody Got Time for That: Time-Saving Social Media Outreach Strategies for Busy UCCs

Presenters:

Olatoun Okediji - Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Jennifer Pattison - Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Keiron Timothy - University of Central Florida

Abstract:

The increase in social media use among college students presents an opportunity for UCCs to provide mental health outreach via social media. Studies have shown college students utilize social media for building social support, nurturing a heterogeneous network and facilitating social adjustments (Bumsoo & Yonghwan, 2017; Drouin et al 2018; DeAndrea et al, 2012). Social media sites are spaces for students to share experiences while developing connections to create a sense of belonging (Vincent, 2016). At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), the Counseling Center Social Media Team has strategically utilized social media to provide a platform for outreach services. The goals of the SMT, included increasing student awareness in ten focus areas: mental health awareness, resources, self-care, academic support, holidays, center programming, cross-promotion of university outreach, motivational messages, and counselor engagement. The SMT also develops content related to diversity and inclusion with the aim of nurturing an affirming space and addressing diversity-related issues, which impact student mental health. This presentation shares the processes, challenges, and outcomes of the ERAU-CC Social Media Team, including time saving strategies for creating and delivering mental health outreach via social media.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will describe objectives, procedures, goals, and outcomes of ERAU CC social media outreach approach.
  • Participants will list time saving strategies for choosing content, scheduling posts and collecting data.
  • Participants will explain what it means to "consciously curate" social media content.
  • Participants will discuss cultural and diversity considerations in creating and posting content.
  • Participants will discuss ethical considerations, risks identified and creative solutions in social media outreach planning and delivery.

Building Community within the Counseling Center: Caring for Each Other During COVID

Presenters:

Emily Wilcox - College of the Holy Cross

Maureen Minarik - Roger Williams University

Abstract:

During the time of COVID mental health professionals face unique challenges, as they are tasked with providing support and stabilization to distressed others while also contending with their own pandemic impacts. On college campuses, Counseling Centers have increasingly been asked to not only respond to the needs of students but also to serve as a support for an anxious, frightened, and frustrated campus. The vast majority of this work is now done remotely, which poses another quality of challenge for mental health care providers and for Counseling Center teams. Unfortunately, it is far too easy for the needs of the Counseling Center itself to be overlooked as institutions focus on adaptation to the pandemic. It is incumbent upon all members of the Counseling Center team to create and engage with systems of support to ensure staff well-being and corresponding quality of services. This presentation will explain the critical nature of attending to the development of healthy workplace culture and how to do so in a remote or partially remote environment.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to identify and explain the factors which impact workplace community and which undermine workplace health.
  • Participants will learn techniques to build and maintain healthy workplace community during COVID

    Increasing Support and Advocacy for Marginalized Communities at Cal during the Pandemic

    Presenters:

    Junichi Shimaoka - Counseling & Psychological Services, University of California, Berkeley

    Adisa Anderson - Counseling & Psychological Services, University of California, Berkeley

    Veronica Orozco - Counseling & Psychological Services, University of California, Berkeley

    Abstract:

    What a year! As multiple pandemics impacted our country in 202 (public health, anti-Black violence, anti-Asian violence, food and housing insecurity, etc), the disproportionate impacts of institutionalized racism on marginalized community became ever more clear and important to address. The state of California was one of the first states to see the cases of COVID-19 and we also recognized and did our best to prepare for the multiple impacts and to provide a sense of community and support for our marginalized student communities. In this presentation, we will highlight the ways in which UC Berkeley's Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) strived to offer a sense of community and support (e.g. community specific Virtual Let's Talk, Healing Circles, Virtual workshops). We will also highlight our institutional and with-in agency advocacy efforts for the increased protection of and consideration for marginalized communities (e.g. Black & Brown communities, Asian/Asian American communities, International students), and the systemic and structural barriers we are working to remove. In the last portion of the presentation, attendees will be invited to share unique efforts on their campuses and to reflect on ways they might create community and advocate for the marginalized students at the institutional and agency level.

    Learning Objective(s):

    • Participants will be able to identify three different types of support offered for the marginalized student communities at UC Berkeley.
    • Participants will be able to examine and explore ways to remove systemic and structural barriers at their respective counseling centers and campuses.

    Nurturing Neurodiversity in the College Community

    Presenters:

    Ali Swoish - Iona College Counseling Center

    Alison Kelly - Iona College Counseling Center

    Abstract:

    Students in postsecondary education face increased social, emotional, and organizational demands associated with emerging adulthood, and these demands are often amplified for students with neurodevelopmental disorders such as ASD. With about 50,000 Americans with autism entering adulthood each year and one third of these young adults attending college, it is imperative to identify ways to better support the needs of neurodivergent students. For 3 years, the Dolce Postgraduate Psychology Fellowship at Iona College Counseling Center has provided individualized therapeutic and psychoeducational intervention for students on the autism spectrum. The goal of the fellowship has been to ensure the success, retention, and personal growth of students on the spectrum, and to ensure that they have access to specialized mental health care for co-occurring symptoms. The inherent separation and isolation of COVID-19 related restrictions has presented a unique danger to these students. The restrictions have exacerbated and intensified feelings of disconnectedness that students on the autism spectrum already feel as a result of their social communication differences. This presentation discusses ways in which the Dolce Fellowship expanded outreach initiatives to provide supportive, consistent, and inclusive space for neurodivergent students to strengthen their capacity to build and maintain relationships in response to COVID-19.

    Learning Objective(s):

    • Develop awareness of the experience of neurodivergent students in college, including data on attendance, graduation, utilization of counseling & accessibility services, primary challenges and struggles, mental health concerns specific to COVID-19.
    • Understand the philosophy, purpose, and structure of the Dolce Fellowship, including its unique combination of individual clinical services, group psycho education, and outreach programming.
    • Learn about feedback and outcomes from specific outreach efforts, including evidence-based experiential courses, accessible virtual programming, curated social activities, and community training, implemented by the Dolce Fellow in order to create a safe,
    • Discuss ways in which your counseling center can initiate, create, and follow through with accessible and inclusive services for neurodivergent students going forward.

    Poster Sessions

    Addressing the Loneliness Epidemic within US College Campuses

    Presenters:

    Kevin Smith - Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

    Wendy Griffith - Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

    Abstract:

    Campuses across the United States are facing a crisis of connection as educational efforts move virtually. With limited ways to experience previous in-person connection and waning motivations to utilize virtual tools (e.g., zoom, teams) beyond required academics, efforts to address this issue is crucial to student well-being.1,2 Loneliness is a common link between disengaged connection and suffering feelings of hindered belongingness.2-4 In order to address the prevalence of loneliness, including its impact on the already severe feelings of disconnection, this 20-minute wellness programming suggests how counseling centers can organize outreach efforts to understand loneliness and improve resources to reduce student loneliness. The initial effort utilized was an educational dialogue about how to perceive, feel, and redirect loneliness with the student's help (e.g., active engagement tasks). Students left the outreach effort understanding different social and emotional forms of loneliness and how to address them in their own contexts. The other effort involved less formal interactions with common activities such as sharing breakfast, having coffee, and reducing isolation during virtual meet-ups. The effort provided students with approachable and flexible methods to have support within the institution, shared experiences, and increased connection with other students resulting in reduced loneliness.

    Learning Objective(s):

    • Attendees to this wellness programming will understand two types of loneliness and processes that college students can connect vulnerability processes with addressing loneliness.
    • Attendees to this wellness programming will develop an understanding of at least two roles social exchange and communication, and lack thereof, play in loneliness within a college setting.
    • Attendees will develop 1-3 strategies to address college student loneliness as well as increased understanding of how to form, build and maintain connections to those students.

    PRN - Here when you need us: Development of a peer resource network to build mental health ambassadors

    Presenters:

    Paige Bentley - Wkae Forest School of Medicine

    Orita Ramseur - Wake Forest School of Medicine

    Abstract:

    Medical students have significantly higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation than age-matched samples and the general population (Maser et al., 2019). The COVID-19 pandemic may have exacerbated these issues as opportunities for peer interaction were limited (Saraswathi et al., 2020). Despite the need for support, medical students are often reluctant to seek help due to fears of stigma. Peer counseling programs, which have been shown to improve mental health indices and help-seeking behavior in university students, may be an antidote (Ahmed et al., 2020). Unfortunately, little evidence exists on the impact of these programs on medical students (Moir et al., 2016). Furthermore, these programs often require significant involvement from counseling staff for supervision of peer counselors. This poster session will share information on peer support program that was developed during COVID-19 to help medical students connect more deeply with each other while also creating opportunities for student-led outreach thus limiting the need for significant oversight. The mission of the Peer Resource Network (PRN: Here when you need us) program is to cultivate a corps of mental health ambassadors to provide support, assistance, and hope to students in times of emotional crisis. Qualitative results from participants will be shared.

    Learning Objective(s):

    • Describe the differences between a peer counseling program and a peer support program and the impact of a peer support program on counseling center resources.
    • Gain detailed knowledge regarding content for an innovative peer support program.
    • Critique ways in which a peer support program can deepen student-to-student connection.

    Stigma Reduction in Higher Education

    Presenters:

    Sarah Sawaf - California State University, San Bernardino

    Abstract:

    Mental health stigma is impacting the perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors of college students. With increasing mental health problems in the college student population and the ongoing barrier of stigma, innovative approaches to destigmatizing mental health are crucial. While many anti-stigma campaigns have been implemented, stigma remains a pressing societal problem that prevents students from seeking services and improving their functioning. This presentation describes the impact of stigma in higher education, the importance of stigma reduction initiatives on college campuses, and the necessity of educational institutions promoting mental health and wellness for their campus communities.

    Learning Objective(s):

    • Describe the impact of mental health stigma in higher education.
    • Analyze your campus's stigma reduction efforts and rate its effectiveness.
    • Revise anti-stigma initiatives to maximize their impact and success in reducing stigma in higher education.


    The Association For University and College Counseling Center Outreach
    Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software